Technology

  • March 04, 2024

    Paul Hastings Hires 6-Partner IP Team From Allen & Overy

    Paul Hastings LLP hired a six-partner litigation team from Allen & Overy LLP to boost the firm's intellectual property practice across the country.

  • March 04, 2024

    Apple Fined €1.8B For Restricting Music Streaming Developers

    The European Union's antitrust authority said Monday that it has fined tech giant Apple €1.8 billion ($1.95 billion) for abusing its dominant position in the market for music streaming apps by preventing developers from letting iPhone users know about cheaper subscriptions.

  • March 01, 2024

    Google Gets Ad Tech Monopolization MDL Trimmed

    A New York federal judge on Friday threw out a number of claims in sprawling multidistrict litigation over Google's alleged monopoly in digital advertising, although the judge held that Google must continue to face limited claims from publishers and advertisers in several cases.

  • March 01, 2024

    Gov't Says AI Patent Gap Between US And China Is Growing

    A report by a U.S. federal agency says that people living in China have been granted more patents than people living in the U.S., and the latest figures suggest an especially widening gap in patents issued over artificial intelligence.

  • March 01, 2024

    EV Maker Rivian Rips Investors' Class Cert. Bid In Fraud Suit

    Investors alleging Rivian Automotive Inc. underpriced its electric vehicles and misrepresented its profitability ahead of a blockbuster 2021 initial public offering cannot certify their class with zero evidence, weak fraud-on-the-market theories and troubling litigation tactics, Rivian argued in a California federal court filing Thursday.

  • March 01, 2024

    USPTO Wants To Make Patent Amendment Pilot Official

    The U.S. Patent and Trademark Office plans to formalize its pilot program assisting patent owners in amending challenged claims, according to a Federal Register notice on Friday.

  • March 01, 2024

    Jury Awards Midwest Energy $57M On Refined Coal Patents

    A Delaware federal jury on Friday awarded Midwest Energy Emissions Corp. more than $57 million after finding that numerous affiliated companies willfully infringed its patents on technology for refining coal to reduce mercury in emissions from power plants.

  • March 01, 2024

    Microsoft Escapes SAIC's Night-Vision Goggle Patent Suit

    A U.S. Court of Federal Claims judge has found that Microsoft Corp. didn't infringe a Science Applications International Corp. patent in a suit accusing the federal government of contracting with Microsoft and L3 Technologies Inc. for night-vision goggle weapon systems with infringing displays, but the judge also denied bids to find the patent invalid.

  • March 01, 2024

    Gilstrap Orders Damages Retrial To Avoid $67.5M 'Train Wreck'

    Chief U.S. District Judge Rodney Gilstrap ordered a damages retrial in infringement litigation between G+ Communications and Samsung on Friday, warning there would otherwise be a "guaranteed 'train wreck'" since both parties failed to explain what they believed the $67.5 million verdict means.

  • March 01, 2024

    Yelp Gets Anti-Abortion Center Disclaimer Suit Axed In Texas

    A Texas state judge has thrown out Texas Attorney General Ken Paxton's lawsuit alleging that Yelp misled customers about crisis pregnancy centers' limited services, agreeing with the online-rating company that the Lone Star State court doesn't have jurisdictional authority to decide the free-speech dispute, which is also being litigated in California.

  • March 01, 2024

    FTC, DOJ Slam Use Of Software To Fix Rent Payments

    The Federal Trade Commission and the U.S. Department of Justice on Friday told a Washington federal judge that landlords can't collude on housing prices even if they're using new technology to do it, adding their input to a case accusing property owners of fixing rental costs with Yardi Systems Inc. software.

  • March 01, 2024

    BofA Trims Zelle Fraud Victims' Suit For Good On 3rd Try

    A California federal judge has again trimmed a lawsuit accusing Bank of America of refusing to reimburse Zelle fraud victims, narrowing the case to a breach of contract claim and denying the plaintiffs another opportunity to rework their complaint.

  • March 01, 2024

    FTC Wants To Split Amazon Antitrust Trial

    The Federal Trade Commission has asked a Washington federal court to split its landmark monopolization case against Amazon into two phases, with a trial to determine if the company violated antitrust law and another to mull potential fixes if the court finds that it did.

  • March 01, 2024

    McCarter & English Denied $1M Fee Bid In Celsius Ch. 11

    A New York bankruptcy judge has granted requests by a number of creditor groups in the Celsius Network Chapter 11 case for fees and expenses but denied a $1 million request by a borrower group represented by McCarter & English, saying it had failed to make a substantial contribution to the case.

  • March 01, 2024

    Colo. Judge Says Atty Depo Is Just 'Nature Of The Beast'

    The lawyer who helped a startup founder negotiate an acquisition deal with another company must sit for a deposition in the founder's suit alleging he was taken advantage of, a Colorado federal judge ruled, saying it was the "nature of the beast" for deals lawyers to sometimes get pulled into litigation.

  • March 01, 2024

    Top Groups Lobbying The FCC

    The Federal Communications Commission heard from companies and interest groups close to 200 times in February on subjects ranging from net neutrality rules to "all-in" cable pricing, device security labels, minimum broadband speeds and more.

  • March 01, 2024

    Network Co. Directors Sue In Chancery To Stop Power Grab

    A power struggle at network connectivity services provider PacketFabric Inc. hit Delaware's Court of Chancery on Thursday, with an investor and two directors suing for a court declaration that they are still members of the board.

  • March 01, 2024

    Judge Doubts Drowsy Juror, Mask Rules Warrant New VC Trial

    A California federal judge expressed doubts Friday over claims that self-described "millennial" venture capitalist Michael Rothenberg deserves a new trial because of a drowsy juror and the court's COVID-19 mask rules, saying he disagrees that the juror was asleep and "welcomes" the Ninth Circuit's guidance on courtroom-masking requirements.

  • March 01, 2024

    'We Don't Know If They Prejudged Meta,' Judge Says Of FTC

    The D.C. federal judge handling Meta's case attacking the Federal Trade Commission's constitutionality and its efforts to reopen a 2020 privacy settlement balked Friday at preliminarily stopping the agency from banning the monetization of children's data.

  • March 01, 2024

    Vidal Asked To Review PTAB Decisions In Semiconductor Fight

    A Dallas company called Greenthread LLC has asked the head of the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office to review decisions of the Patent Trial and Appeal Board allowing challenges to claims in a pair of its patents.

  • March 01, 2024

    Amazon Didn't Dupe Prime Buyer With TV Deal, Judge Rules

    An Amazon Prime customer who says he was tricked into thinking he saved $700 on a TV can't pursue fraud and deceptive practice claims against Amazon, an Illinois federal judge has ruled, finding that even if he only saved $100 compared to recent pricing, he still got exactly what he paid for.

  • March 01, 2024

    FTC Backs Colo. Right-To-Repair Expansion

    A Federal Trade Commission representative appeared at a Colorado legislative hearing in support of a proposed "right-to-repair" law requiring manufacturers to provide documentation, software, data and certain tools to allow consumers to fix their own digital electronic equipment.

  • March 01, 2024

    Legal Study Site Says Data Privacy Claims Don't Apply To It

    Sellers International has asked a California federal court to dismiss a law school student's proposed class action claiming it shares video-watching data and other personal information with a third party without consent, arguing that the suit fails to show it is a videotape service provider and that it disclosed any personal information, and his suit risks violating the company's First Amendment rights.

  • March 01, 2024

    IT Firm Workers' $70M Race Bias Verdict Scrapped

    A Texas federal court on Friday wiped away a $70 million jury verdict that 10 former information technology company workers won in a race discrimination suit, saying the evidence didn't back up the hefty damages award.

  • March 01, 2024

    Technology Group Of The Year: Covington

    Covington & Burling LLP blocked a Montana law from going into effect that would have banned TikTok across the state and is currently taking on a challenge lobbed at Microsoft over privacy issues stemming from artificial intelligence, earning the firm a place among Law360's 2023 Technology Groups of the Year.

Expert Analysis

  • Strategies For Single-Member Special Litigation Committees

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    The Delaware Supreme Court's recent order in the Baker Hughes derivative litigation allowing testimony from a single-member special litigation committee highlights the fact that, while single-member SLCs are subject to heightened scrutiny, they can also provide unique opportunities, says Josh Bloom at MoloLamken.

  • How Firms Can Ensure Associate Gender Parity Lasts

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    Among associates, women now outnumber men for the first time, but progress toward gender equality at the top of the legal profession remains glacially slow, and firms must implement time-tested solutions to ensure associates’ gender parity lasts throughout their careers, say Kelly Culhane and Nicole Joseph at Culhane Meadows.

  • Bracing Cos. For Calif. Privacy Agency's Restored Authority

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    A recent California state appeals court decision greenlights the California Privacy Protection Agency's enforcement of certain consumer privacy regulations, which may speed up compliance requirements, so businesses considering use of artificial intelligence, for instance, may want to reassess their handling of privacy notices and opt-out requests, say Kevin Angle and Matthew Cin at Ropes & Gray.

  • Fed. Circ. In Feb.: Using Prior Products To Invalidate A Patent

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    The Federal Circuit's recent Weber v. Provisu ruling, that prior-product operating manuals constituted printed publications that can be used to invalidate patents in an inter partes review proceeding, makes it easier for a petitioner to invalidate a patent, say Sean Murray and Jeremiah Helm at Knobbe Martens.

  • How Cos. Can Assess Open-Source Contribution Patent Risks

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    Recent trends underscore the importance of open-source software to the technology industry for both engineering and strategic purposes, and companies should consider using a framework that addresses whether contributions require granting licenses to patent claims in portfolios to analyze associated risks, says Shrut Kirti at TAE Technologies.

  • 7 Common Myths About Lateral Partner Moves

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    As lateral recruiting remains a key factor for law firm growth, partners considering a lateral move should be aware of a few commonly held myths — some of which contain a kernel of truth, and some of which are flat out wrong, says Dave Maurer at Major Lindsey.

  • Following The Road Map Toward Quantum Security

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    With the Financial Conduct Authority’s recent publication of a white paper on a quantum-secure financial sector, firms should begin to consider the quantum transition early — before the process is driven by regulatory obligations — with the goal of developing a cybersecurity architecture that is agile while also allowing for quantum security, say lawyers at Cleary.

  • What's At Stake In Pending Fed. Circ. Design Patent Test Case

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    The full Federal Circuit recently heard argument in LKQ v. GM Global, a case concerning patent obviousness in the aftermarket for auto parts; the court's decision will likely influence how design patents are obtained, enforced and challenged, and affect the broader innovation ecosystem, says Larry DeMeo at Hunton.

  • NYC Workplace AI Regulation Has Been Largely Insignificant

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    Though a Cornell University study suggests that a New York City law intended to regulate artificial intelligence in the workplace has had an underwhelming impact, the law may still help shape the city's future AI regulation efforts, say Reid Skibell and Nathan Ades at Glenn Agre.

  • 2 Emerging Defenses For Website Tracking Class Actions

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    Putative class actions premised on state wiretapping statutes that bar website activity tracking continue to be on the rise, but they are increasingly being dismissed on two procedural grounds, says Sheri Pan at ZwillGen.

  • No AI FRAUD Act Is A Significant Step For Right Of Publicity

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    The No Artificial Intelligence Fake Replicas and Unauthorized Duplications Act's proposed federal right of publicity protection, including post-mortem rights, represents a significant step toward harmonizing the landscape of right of publicity law, Rachel Hofstatter and Aaron Rosenthal at Honigman.

  • Series

    Cheering In The NFL Makes Me A Better Lawyer

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    Balancing my time between a BigLaw career and my role as an NFL cheerleader has taught me that pursuing your passions outside of work is not a distraction, but rather an opportunity to harness important skills that can positively affect how you approach work and view success in your career, says Rachel Schuster at Sheppard Mullin.

  • Keeping Up With Class Actions: Data Breach Litigation In Flux

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    In this monthly look at notable class action decisions, Gerald Maatman at Duane Morris examines a recent mixed-bag data breach ruling from an Illinois federal court — in the context of case law developments over the last year — which illustrates the range of issues confronting litigants going forward.

  • Considerations For Disclosing AI Use In SEC Filings

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    Recent remarks from U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission Chair Gary Gensler should be heard as a clarion call for public companies to disclose artificial intelligence use, with four takeaways on what companies should disclose, says Richard Hong at Morrison Cohen.

  • Averting Patent And Other IP Risks In Generative AI Use

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    While leveraging generative AI presents potential problems such as loss of ownership of patents and other intellectual properties, a series of practice tips, including ensuring that the technology is used as a supplementary tool and is not contributing to invention conception, can help mitigate those concerns, say Mackenzie Martin and Bryce Bailey at Baker McKenzie.

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